Archive for August, 2008

New Software: HRFun (OS X)

I have been spending a fair amount of time learning the Objective-C programming language lately. While I spend most of my time in Matlab, I am thinking about writing some Mac OS X applications in the future. For those of you who are looking to do the same I can highly recommend the Aaron Hillegass […]

August 23, 2008 • Posted in: CogNeuro, MRI • No Comments

Quote of the Week – Tukey

“The combination of some data and an aching desire for an answer does not ensure that a reasonable answer can be extracted from a given body of data.” – John W. Tukey, 1986

August 18, 2008 • Posted in: Quotes, Statistics • No Comments

Brain Art: Axial Mosaic

This is a piece we did as a cover illustration for the journal Human Brain Mapping. It depicts an axial slice of the brain composed of smaller images in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes. To get the smaller images we used a simple Matlab script to go through each subject’s high-resolution 3D anatomical image […]

August 13, 2008 • Posted in: CogNeuro, MRI • No Comments

Prefrontal.org anniversary!

Truth be told we are a few weeks past the one year mark. Still, I couldn’t be happier about the degree of progress this blog has made in the last twelve months. What began as a simple motivation to practice writing has slowly evolved to become a more complete personal weblog of developmental cognitive neuroscience. […]

August 10, 2008 • Posted in: Meta • No Comments

Quote of the Week – Fisher

“Modern statisticians are familiar with the notion that any finite body of data contains only a limited amount of information on any point under examination; that this limit is set by the nature of the data themselves, and cannot be increased by any amount of ingenuity expended in their statistical examination: that the statistician’s task, […]

August 8, 2008 • Posted in: Quotes, Statistics • No Comments

Summer Heatwave

Santa Barbara is an absolutely horrible place to be in the summertime. I mean, come on, 77 degrees? Who can stand that?

August 8, 2008 • Posted in: Meta • No Comments

Principal Components of Individual Differences

I have been spending the last few weeks exploring principal components analysis (PCA) of functional imaging data. PCA has been around for over a century, having first been invented by Karl Pearson in 1901. I have always been taught that PCA was a powerful data reduction technique, allowing a handful of components to represent the […]

August 6, 2008 • Posted in: Statistics • No Comments