Voodoo Perspectives on Psychological Science

I received my May 2009 issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science in the mail last week. This is the issue containing the original Voodoo Correlations paper along with responses from, well, just about everybody. Man, is it chock-full of debate. I don’t know if I have ever seen a journal volume published with more commentary than original articles, but such is the case here.

It has been quite fascinating to read the original Vul et al. paper once more with the added context of the comments. Ed Diener made a very good point in his Editor’s Introduction: by publishing the article online before it appeared in an APS journal Vul et al. effectively short-circuited the comment process, giving his article a window of time without published criticism or opposition. The comments add a new, and I believe necessary, dimension to the discussion.

If you are still interested in the debate then I highly recommend sitting down for a while and reading through the comments. Also, don’t forget to check out the new Kriegeskorte, Simmons, Bellgowan, and Baker (2009) article in Nature Neuroscience and a new commentary by Poldrack and Mumford (2009) on Voodoo Correlations in SCAN.


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The full online table of contents from the APS:

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/journals/pps/4_3.cfm


Articles in Perspectives related to Voodoo/Puzzling debate:

Editor’s Introduction to Vul et al. (2009) and Comments
Ed Diener

Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition
Edward Vul, Christine Harris, Piotr Winkielman, and Harold Pashler

Commentary on Vul et al.’s (2009) “Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition”
Thomas E. Nichols and Jean-Baptist Poline

Big Correlations in Little Studies: Inflated fMRI Correlations Reflect Low Statistical Power. Commentary on Vul et al. (2009)
Tal Yarkoni

Correlations in Social Neuroscience Aren’t Voodoo: Commentary on Vul et al. (2009)
Matthew D. Lieberman, Elliot T. Berkman, and Tor D. Wager

Discussion of “Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition” by Vul et al. (2009)
Nicole A. Lazar

Correlations and Multiple Comparisons in Functional Imaging: A Statistical Perspective (Commentary on Vul et al., 2009)
Martin A. Lindquist and Andrew Gelman

Understanding the Mind by Measuring the Brain: Lessons From Measuring Behavior (Commentary on Vul et al., 2009)
Lisa Feldman Barrett

Reply to Comments on “Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition”
Edward Vul, Christine Harris, Piotr Winkielman, and Harold Pashler

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